Tuesday, August 22, 2006

Vancouver Week Three: "last but not least"

Given that DNA can be used to predict the likelihood of getting certain diseases, should anybody be entitled to have access to your genetic data? For example life insurance companies already ask health questions and perform blood tests to determine your insurability and would probably find your genetic information very useful. As a further example, your physician maybe able to provide you with better treatment if he or she was able to determine your predispositions for genetic diseases. Would YOU want to know? Share your thoughts.

27 comments:

Anonymous said...

BioTrek roxorz my boxorz!!! XD

caiwang64 said...

Yes, if I were able to see into my genetic predispositions, i would not hesitate to be informed. I believe that on a personal level, it would allow us to make wiser decisions and adjust our lifestyles accordingly to better our possible predicaments. However, such information should not be disclosed to any 3rd parties such as insurance companies as this would be an intrusion of our privacy and an act of discriminiation, or genoism as the characters in GATTACA refer.

My apologies for the previous comment.

DanSun said...

I do not think that 'anybody' should be able to have access to my genetic data. However, If someone needs my genetic data to perform tests that I have requested, then I should be able to have the power to provide permission to thoes people.

BiotrekROCKS! said...
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ChinaDoll said...

I think people should be entitled to have access to their own genetic info if it could help them get better treatment for certain diseases. Individuals should have the right to choose whether or not they'd like to have their genetic information. I would want to know only if it means that I'd get better treatment to help me live a healtheir life. If I have a probability of getting some incurable disease then I'd rather not know. So I think people's genetic info should be obtained and kept secret and the individual should have the right to choose to whether or not they want anyone, including themselves, to have access to that data.

Anonymous said...

I think that your genetic data should be kept confidential between you and whomever else you wish to disclose it to... similar to conversations with a personal psychologist or lawyer. Your DNA should never have to be mandatorily presented at any time- it should only be used if you consent to it. It is like your family history: it should have nothing to do with a job interview; but if telling your doctor about your genes could potentially save your life, then who wouldn't?

Amy said...
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Sofia said...
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llamapalooza03 said...
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Sofia said...
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Diana said...

I do not think anyone other than the person him/herself should have access to his/her genetic data because it would provide grounds for discrimination based on the PROBABILITY of being susceptible to that disease. In the given example, life insurance companies would not only test your present physical and mental state, but also evaluate a prediction of your future physical and mental state to base your premiums, or acceptance of insurance on. All of this is based on the likelihood, with no guarantee of occurrence.
Personally, I would not want to know how likely I am to succumb to this disease or that disease because it would be too suffocating to know I could die if I did or did not do certain things. Thus, I would rather, excuse the cliché, live like it is the last day of my life than not live at all and be bound by overhanging fears of disease. Like Vincent in ‘Gattaca’, I would rather believe I can only be capable of the things I try than be hindered by never trying because of the likelihood of a disease.

murrayhuynh said...

The answer to this quiestion is no i wouldnt want to know. i dont want my DNA to determine my life i just want everything to happen naturally for me. There are chances that the information we get could be wrong and i dont want to be worrying about a disease that i dont even have. i just want to live a normal and sucessful life.

Peace.

Amy said...

When it comes to giving the authority to others to know whether my probabilities of being infected with any genetic diseases is high or low, it really varies on who it is. If giving my genetic data to one who does no advantage to me, or harm, then obviously no. Although I do believe that this advantage can allow me to know more and maybe prevent or reduce the chances of getting the disease or sickness in the future.

Sofia said...

I would like to know if I have a genetic predisposition to any disease because by knowing this you are able to act and maybe minimize that probability.

K.C. said...

I don't think I would like to know. Although it can be put to good use, if you don't have the disease or you might/might not, I don't think I would care. I'd rather live my life without 'maybe's floating around in my head. I think I have enough to worry about when it comes to crossing the street or driving, without thinking about something that is/could be killing me from the inside and I can't stop it. I believe in living in the moment (with consideration for tomorrow of course; you have to think at least a little bit of the future), but how can you do that if you're dreading the next day because you might get or you have got something that could kill you?

Besides, I wouldn't like to have a stranger looking at my genetic data. It's like reading a diary, in a way. It's private, it tells about your life. If anyone is going to look at my data, it's going to be me (and, if it is absolutely necessary, someone who could save my life).

But as it is, I don't want to know, and I don't want anyone else to know either.

Sofia said...

I would like to know because if there might be a chance to minimize the probability of that genetic predisposicion to a disease.

The love of your life said...

What's unique about humans above all other living things is our ability to make choices.We choose to live our life the way
WE want to, not the way "nature" intended so. Having a genetic probability given to you at birth destroys all of those priviledges. When your future is set in stone, there is no hope, no motivation, and above all else, no chance for you to exceed what the numbers say on paper. In some cases, the unknown is very frightening, but how does that stand up to someone telling you that you cannnot achieve something, regardeless of how hard you try?

...

MY PINK I-POD ROCKS!

llamapalooza04 said...

I think that your genetic information should be kept confidential between you and whomever you wish to disclose it to... similar to the conversations held between friends, personal psychologists, or lawyers.
You should never have to mandatorily present it at any time unless you are a suspect for a crime. Just like family history, religion, and skin colour, your DNA should not be a factor during a job interview; but if telling your doctor about it could save your life... well, who wouldn't want to share?

DanSun said...

I'm not sure that being informed of our own genetic predispositions would really benefit us in any way. Instead, I think that it would hinder our lively, youthful selves and would eventually force us to be cautious about every little thing we do in our lives. Knowing as little as possible about what we will get, catch or become, I think one would find oneself a lot less stressed. (as if we're not stressed enough!)

--response to caiwang

The love of your life said...

What's unique about humans above all other living things is our ability to make choices.We choose to live our life the way
WE want to, not the way "nature" intended so. Having a genetic probability given to you at birth destroys all of those priviledges. When your future is set in stone, there is no hope, no motivation, and above all else, no chance for you to exceed what the numbers say on paper. In some cases, the unknown is very frightening, but how does that stand up to someone telling you that you cannnot achieve something, regardeless of how hard you try?

...

MY PINK I-POD ROCKS!

llamapalooza03 said...

I think that by no means should a person's genetic information be able to be common knowledge. Obviously many people would share it with doctors, but as for the life insurance example, genetic information should not have to be disclosed. Although fictional, the movie Gattaca predicted what could happen should this technology become more mainstream and the 'norm' in society. The film predicted that if genetic information is accessable for everyone, discrimintation could become much more prominant. Personally, I would not like to know my genetic information. I would prefer not to know if there was a chance that I had a disease since I think this would affect the way I currently live my life. And since the genetic information is not 100%, there is always a chance that I was fine anyhow and lived a cautious life when I hadn't needed to, which would almost be more devastating.
So, after a long drawn out answer, I think that it is really up to the person to disclose or even know this information, but I wouldn't want to.

sharanya said...

The way the question is worded, I wouldn't want anyone to be able to know my genetic data. At first I thought I would want to know myself but then your life become entangled in mays or may-not-be's. The only person I'd want my genetic data available to is my doctor or medical staff who would find it helpful. I suppose DNA just isn't something I'd be willing to hand over to anyone. Giving out DNA information should be allocated by the people themselves. The whole idea of being able to clone yourself is a bit creepy and it makes me wonder how people would use DNA for malicious purposes. DNA may just become the next best weapon.

DanSun said...

who's dansun? I don't know but I know that you would like to know who it is. :)

bloggie4 said...

I would certainlylike to know...because there might be a chance of minimizing the probability of that genetic predisposition towards a disease.

llamapalooza04 said...

I think that your genetic information should be kept confidential between you and whomever you wish to disclose it to... similar to the conversations held between friends, personal psychologists, or lawyers. I would like to know about my own DNA just like I'd like to know if I had cancer or was HIV positive.
You should never have to mandatorily present it at any time unless you are a suspect for a crime. Just like family history, religion, and skin colour, your DNA should not be a factor during a job interview; but if telling your doctor about it could save your life... well, who wouldn't want to share?

albert said...
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Anonymous said...

It is hard to say because it can negatively and positively affect.
If people know what kind of diseases they are going to have, they can prevent and get treated earlier. However, if people find out their future health problems, they can be scared and may not be able to continue their lives like they did before knowing their future.